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Shiitake Mushroom & Broccoli Saute

Shiitake mushrooms are high in naturally occurring spermidine and are prized around the world for their medicinal and healing properties.  Shiitake mushrooms have been called the "miracle mushroom" due to their immune boosting properties.  They can be added to your soup, salad, grains and vegetable dishes.  They can also be bought in powder form and sprinkled on food for flavor and nutrition. 

Broccoli is a nutritional powerhouse.  It's high in natural glutathione and B vitamins to mitigate stress as well as keeping gray hair at bay.  It is a good source of fiber, protein, and Vitamin K.

 

Here is a quick and delicious recipe for a nutrient-rich vegetable saute: 

6 oz / 170 g Shiitake mushrooms, stems cut, sliced

Head of broccoli

Olive oil

Onion, diced

Garlic, chopped

Ginger, chopped

Stock, chicken or vegetable, cube or fresh

Fermented soy sauce, or tamari (gluten-free option)

Red pepper flakes, or any other spice desired

Quickly rinse mushrooms or simply wipe the caps with a damp paper towel.  If the stems are too tough to eat, use a sharp paring knife to remove them and save them for a broth.  Set aside. 

Chop a head of broccoli into pieces about the length of your thumb.

Boil in a pot of salted boiling water.  Once water boils, keep at a medium heat and at a low boil for about 5 minutes until al dente and remove from water to leave the oxalates behind.

While the broccoli is boiling, drizzle olive oil in a saucepan and add diced onions, chopped garlic, and chopped ginger (pre-chopped frozen can work well if in a hurry).  Once soft, add shiitake mushrooms. 

Add chicken bone broth, homemade, frozen or stock cube.  If using a stock cube, add water to it. 

Stir in mushrooms until soft and add cooked broccoli.

Season with fermented soy sauce, tamari, salt and other spices to taste.

 

A note from our Founder, Leslie Kenny:

I enjoy this stir fry with boiled white rice that has been cooled and then reheated.  This makes it a resistant starch that helps feed the healthy bugs in your gut biome.  I add a dash of MCT oil to the rice to enhance its prebiotic properties even more.

 

I enjoy eating this dish in the evening because having carbs at night helps with my sleep.  While some say that white rice converts to sugar in the blood stream leading to an unhealthy sugar spike, cooking, cooling and adding MCTs reduce this.

 

Here is a study showing how the conversion of rice into a resistant starch changes the body's glycemic response.  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26693746/

 

Happy eating!